DSC06214Umami.

It’s what’s been sorely lacking from my experiments with short ribs.

Let me back up a bit.

I’ve had to tighten up my foods a bit for autoimmune reasons, and I have cracked down hard on the nightshades because¬†THEY. WRECK. ME.

As in arthritis to the point of not being able to open my hands, cystic lesions on my face, and a general all-over inflammation that makes me feel like I am constantly fighting off a virus.

I’m good with avoiding bell peppers and eggplant. That’s not so challenging. And eating out is really challenging because folks like to sneak paprika in a lot of dishes.

But tomatoes. Ah, tomatoes. Such a versatile food.

Fresh, with some salt. Wedged between mozzarella slices. Mixed with cilantro and onions and served as salsa. Chili.

And, umami.

Tomatoes are high in glutamic acid, which serves up umami in abundance and that’s why people rely on them to add richness and flavor to roasts, stews and dishes that cook a long time.

Like braised short ribs.

The thing about experimenting with short rib recipes is that those suckers are expensive. And, if you cook dinner all day in a crock pot, you want some flavor at the end of the day. So, I don’t play with short ribs very frequently.

But my butcher had some lovely ones last week, and I couldn’t resist. After I got home, I shot a note to the autoimmune guru, Eileen at Phoenix Helix. She agreed that AI-friendly short rib recipes were tough to come by and offered up one that I had already tried and either ruined on my own or just didn’t enjoy.

When it came time to cook, I was faced with that same old problem – how to inject some umami in there without relying on tomatoes or red wine, which can also be problematic for the AI folks. I also didn’t want to rely on the Asian short rib recipes which, although tasty, don’t always scratch the itch I am having for short ribs.

Then, I saw the mushrooms my CSA had sent me.

Mushrooms rank high on the umami scale, so I wondered if they could impart some of DSC06215their goodness to my short ribs if they were all nestled in the slow-cooker together for a few hours.

The resulting dish was a big hit. The kids all enjoyed their dinner and my husband gave the dish a blog-worthy thumbs up.

So here it is and I hope you enjoy it. If you have other short rib recipes that are AI-friendly, please (pretty please!) share them in the comments.

Slow-Cooker Beef Short Ribs with Mushrooms
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 4 lbs. grassfed beef short ribs
  • 2 8oz. packages of whole mushrooms (I used cremini and Baby Bella)
  • 1 TBSP freshly grated ginger
  • 2 cloves garlic, minced
  • ½ TBSP coconut oil
  • 1 cup broth, preferably homemade beef broth
  • 3 TBSP coconut aminos
  • ½ tsp fish sauce (buy one without MSG or other additives like Red Boat)
  • ½ tsp salt plus more to taste
  • pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. (You need a slow-cooker that is large enough to accommodate 4 lbs. of short ribs.)
  2. Shake mushrooms in colander to remove silt and debris. Give them a very quick rinse if you'd like or wipe them off with a soft cloth.
  3. Pour mushrooms in bottom of slow-cooker.
  4. Add ginger and garlic to slow-cooker. Mix gently to combine.
  5. On the stovetop, heat a skillet over medium-high heat. I prefer cast iron for the flavor it develops in the meat.
  6. Melt coconut oil in skillet.
  7. Brown ribs, being sure to get all sides of the meat. Work in batches to avoid overcrowding.
  8. Add salt and pepper to taste as you brown.
  9. Add meat to slow-cooker.
  10. Retain all drippings in your skillet and remove from heat.
  11. Add broth, coconut aminos, and fish sauce to the skillet.
  12. Cook gently over low heat, whisking to combine and scraping the bottom of the skillet to break up the browned bits.
  13. Remove from heat and pour liquid over short ribs in slow-cooker.
  14. Cook on low for 8 hours, or until your meat is tender and falling off the bone.
  15. At the end of the cooking cycle, remove ribs and cover with foil to keep them warm.
  16. Pour all the cooking liquid and mushrooms into a saucepan.
  17. Add ½ tsp salt, or more to taste.
  18. Bring to boil then reduce to simmer. Allow liquid to simmer gently for about ten minutes, or until the flavor concentrates to your liking.
  19. Serve meat with mushrooms on the side and the liquid drizzled over the top.

Nourishing Joy runs a great blog carnival called Thank Goodness It’s Monday! This recipe appears in issue #55 so go check it out!

Eileen at Phoenix Helix puts out a great list of AIP-friendly recipes each week. Roundtable #12 is here and you can find this recipe there!

Find more Real Food recipes here on Real Food Wednesdays!

5 Responses to “Slow-Cooker Beef Short Ribs with Mushrooms”

  1. on 13 May 2014 at 9:00 amautoimmune paleo slow cooker recipes

    […] Slow-Cooker Beef Short Ribs with Mushrooms […]

  2. on 29 May 2014 at 7:51 pmLiz

    Wow, is this good. I prepared it in about 20 minutes while getting myself ready for work. That means its easy to prepare. It tastes great!

  3. on 29 May 2014 at 7:55 pmKristine Rudolph

    I am so glad that you liked it and thanks for popping by to comment!

  4. on 23 Jul 2014 at 9:23 pmMelissa

    I found you through a search for Short Ribs without nightshades! My daughter is allergic and ALL of the recipes have tomatoes! I myself LOVE Italian food, and I am having fingers crossed she grows out of it!
    None-the-less, so happy to have found the recipe, AND a crockpot one too!! WIN WIN! I am wondering though if you have even had a problem with them being too “greasy”? Last time I cooked them in the crock pot it was swimming in grease and they were TOO greasy to eat. Thanks so much!

  5. on 26 Jul 2014 at 10:37 pmKristine Rudolph

    Oh no!

    I definitely have not had that problem. Where do you get your short ribs? Perhaps you can have the butcher trim them a bit before you buy them?

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