Yesterday, I explained my recent epiphany that we women of Gen X never had a prayer to be anything but neurotic about food.  We were exposed to lessons in dieting, deprivation and self-flagellation when it comes to food and eating early in our maturation process.

I wanted to toss another little Teen Works tidbit your way today.

I am something of an alignment geek.  I spend a lot of my spare time studying up on it, I watch people move in their bodies, and I cue my classes ad nauseum about standing, sitting and walking the way their bodies were designed to accomplish those tasks.

So, it was with a knitted brow and a tilt of the head that I read the section on “Posture” from my little notebook:

IMG_1054

 

Much could be said about every one of those bullet points, but #5 perplexes me the most.

I mean, try it.  Try to actually stand with your “lower back flat.”  It looks weird.  It feels weird.

And it makes you tuck your pelvis.

Why not force your back into a flat position?

Spinal curve is a tricky thing because although there is no absolute value of curvature that is appropriate for every person, there is a curve relative to one’s body parts that needs to be exact, in order to ensure proper vertebral loading.

Katy Bowman

In other words, if you don’t allow your spine to remain in the curve that is natural for your body and the way it is built, it will not be able to properly bear weight.  And eventually that will affect your bones, the tissues that mingle among the bones, and ultimately you will hurt.

So I know I yap on and on about how awful it is that women have been trained to tuck their pelvises. And I think, “Maybe I talk about this a little too much in class and on the blog.”  Then I see pages like this one in a publication from my adolescence and I remember just how ingrained this message is.

So yeah, I’ll probably keep yapping away.

One Response to “Now for a Little “Posture,” Circa 1987”

  1. […] friend who reads the blog shot me a note about yesterday’s and Tuesday’s posts.  She wondered what our kids would be saying in 25 years about the awful […]

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